3A – Funding to Address Student Achievement, Whole Child

Less than one year ago, the Jeffco community came together to make a critical change to our school board. By a 2-1 margin, Jeffco voters made it clear that they wanted school board members who have Jeffco students’ best interests at heart.

We at JeffCo School Board Watch support the five new school board members’ decision to put a mill levy override and bond on this November’s ballot. We are pleased to see that funds from the mill, 3A, will be distributed equitably to benefit all of Jeffco’s 155 schools – including every neighborhood school, option school, and charter school.

Charter schools, which educate 10 percent of Jeffco’s students, will receive 10 percent of the mill. And that same equitable distribution will be true for all neighborhood and option schools in Jeffco.

Under the current school budget system, known as Student Based Budgeting (SBB), Jeffco’s schools have a small amount of discretionary money that allows them to choose the services, programming, and support that will most benefit their unique student population. The mill levy override will provide much-needed funds so that schools can fully afford choices that support student achievement while also nurturing the whole child.

Exciting options include more hands-on learning opportunities, enhanced and expanded art, music, career and technical education, as well as additional investment in and expansion of STEM – science, technology, math and engineering – programming.

Schools that only have a half-time librarian might use some of the discretionary money from 3A to pay for a full-time librarian, while other schools may choose to invest the dollars into a full-time counselor, math or reading interventionist, or additional hands-on opportunities for their students.

Jeffco’s 2020 Vision talks about what a successful graduate in the year 2020 will be able to do, and places a priority on providing all Jeffco students – from the youngest to those heading off to college or a career – the necessary educational experiences to achieve this vision.

Students need 21st century skills so they’re prepared for the jobs of the future. They need greater access to STEM, technology and hands-on experiences.

They need to hone their abilities when it comes to teamwork, critical thinking, strong math and science knowledge, and a strong reading and writing base. The Jeffco 2020 Vision also requires multiple pathways and differentiated learning supports based on student needs.

As a community, we rely on Jeffco students to become our future leaders. Issue 3A invests in Jeffco students’ future.

Our district needs your help to ensure voters have the facts so they can support this measure. Please donate to help the Yes on 3A & 3B campaign educate more voters.

We fully expect the ousted school board members and their cohorts to invest in mailers that distort the truth. By investing in the campaign, you can help  Jeffco voters understand the important of investing in Jeffco students.

The Yes on 3A and 3B campaign could also use your help walking door to door, or calling voters, or writing a letter to the editor.

Pick up and display a yard sign, and print out this sign for your car window.

After you vote, start using this graphic in your social media profiles to encourage others to vote, too.

img_7421Please join all of us at JeffCo School Board Watch as we work together to pass 3A and 3B November 8!

 

JeffCo Proud!

3.9.15 A New Surprise: Newkirk’s Jefferson Area “Plan B”

So by now you’ve hopefully heard about the Jeffco School Board member John Newkirk’s Jefferson Area “Plan B,” which he introduced (surprise!) in a motion at Thursday night’s meeting. In fact, it was one of a series of motions about the Jefferson Plan—one that took everyone by such surprise that even the board secretary, Marta Neil, had to ask Newkirk to repeat his motion because it wasn’t the motion she’d received in the board notes.

Here were the first motions:

1. Establish a 7-12 Jefferson High School.
2. Move grades 5 and 6 from Wheat Ridge 5-8 to Stevens Elementary.

Both motions passed unanimously.

And then, Newkirk’s third motion:

To move Everitt Middle School to Wheat Ridge 5-8, then move Manning Middle School to Everitt, and split Maple Grove into two schools. Maple Grove grades 4-6 would move to Manning Middle School and grades K-3 would stay at the current site.

The proposal was one suggested by the Wheat Ridge Articulation Alliance but has not been discussed with the Manning or Maple Grove communities, much less the Stevens, Everitt, and Sobesky communities.

District staff immediately pointed out that the third motion would make it impossible to carry out the second motion, because Stevens is already at capacity as a PK-4 school. They would be one classroom short starting out, and wouldn’t have room to grow.

Superintendent Dan McMinimee pointed out the third motion would make it impossible to move Sobesky to a new location and the district would lose both the opportunity bring Jeffco students back to Jeffco, and the opportunity to recoup some of the cost savings that would come with it. The current Sobesky campus is at capacity, resulting in some students being placed out of district. Between 40 to 60 Jeffco students currently placed out-of-district would be able to return. The cost to place a student out of district runs between $60k – $80k.

Julie Williams was obviously surprised by the motion and asked what would happen to Sobesky. Witt said they’d open a north campus. Williams asked where, and Witt dismissed her, saying the BOE would need recommendations from the district. Williams pointed out that a second campus would mean many additional costs, such as an additional principal.

Then she asked Newkirk why he supported the proposal, to which he responded that he wasn’t sure that he did, but thought it deserved a discussion because it had been brought forth by the community. Of note: only two people spoke in favor of this Plan B during public comment, though several spoke in favor of the Jefferson Area Plan.

Staff had also previously discussed the Wheat Ridge Alliance’s proposal but found it to be unworkable.

As a reminder, the proposed plan worked like this:

– Jefferson High School becomes a 7-12 school
– Stevens becomes a PK-6 school and moves to the Wheat Ridge 5-8 campus.
– The 7th and 8th grade GT Center Program moves from WR 5-8 to Everitt Middle School, and allows 6th grade students from Stevens to matriculate to Everitt for 7th or to Jefferson HS as a first priority choice enrollment
– Sobesky Academy moves to the current Stevens campus

The motion was tabled and community meetings have been scheduled. Here are the dates of the community meetings for Everitt, Maple Grove and Manning:

  • Monday, March 16th, 6-7 pm., Everitt Middle School
  • Tuesday, March 17, 6-7 pm, Maple Grove Elementary
  • Wednesday, March 18, 6-7 pm, Manning Option School

Please spread the word, especially if you know families at these schools or families at Stevens and Sobesky, where, as best we can tell, no meetings have been scheduled to discuss how the failure to do anything would impact those school communities.

There’s more to come about Thursday’s board meeting, but we wanted to get the word out about the community meetings. The board is expected to vote on the tabled motion at the April regular meeting.

Keep watching, keep fighting JeffCo!