5.5.16 FMP & BOE Meeting Preview

Before we get into the preview of Thursday’s BOE regular meeting, we would like to remind you of the importance of reviewing the district’s Facilities Master Plan and then sharing your comments with the board. You can email the board (board@jeffco.k12.co.us), attend one of the 10 remaining community meetings on the FMP to provide your input, participate in a survey online to share your thoughts and/or sign up here to speak to the board at Thursday’s BOE meeting during public comment.

Visit the Jeffco Schools website for more information about the FMP, including Frequently Asked Questions, information on funding challenges, and info on potential funding options.

Your Childs Education

Now, onto the upcoming BOE meeting. The study session begins at 5 pm (note the change: this study session starts a bit earlier than the usual 5:30 pm) a meeting between board members and the City of Edgewater’s mayor and city council members to discuss items of mutual interest. We recognize and appreciate the effort of this board to meet with our local officials to strengthen the partnership between our communities and our schools!

The regular board meeting begins at 6:30 pm.Here’s the link to watch the meeting online:  http://new.livestream.com/accounts/10429076/events/3542310

Honors, Recognition and School Reports

The board will honor Manning School student Ellie Schwiker for her first place award in the Gilder Lehrman Institute and Civil War Roundtable of New York 2016 national Civil War Research Essay Contest! You can read her essay here.

That’s followed by individual member school reports and public comment. Sign up here to address the board during public comment part 1, but remember that this part is reserved only for items on the agenda. If you want to speak on other items, sign up for public comment part 2.

The board will also recognize Jeffco Schools’ Wrestling State Champions from Pomona High School, Lakewood High School and Jefferson High School; and Golden High School and Bear Creek High Schools’ Debate State Champions!

Columbine High School soccer coach, Peter Horvath, will be recognized for being inducted into the 53rd class of CO High School Coaches Association Hall of Fame, and Ken Caryl Middle School’s principal, Patrick Sandos, will be recognized for his “unanimous and enthusiastic endorsement” for the Distinguished Service Award from the CO Association of School Executive (CASE).

Last, but certainly not least, Green Mountain High School principal Colleen Owens has been named 2016 Colorado High School Principal of the Year by CASE!

Congratulations to all of Jeffco’s amazing students and staff!

Proposed 2016/2017 Budget

After board reports and public comment, district staff will present the 2016/2017 Proposed Budget to the board. You can view their presentation and the proposed budget, and you can sign up to address the board about the budget here. This is a separate public comment period that will occur after the the proposed budget is presented to the board.

Note that the budget will be adopted at the next regular BOE meeting on June 2nd. Current projections suggest that the negative factor remains unchanged, meaning that school districts across the state are receiving $855 million less than they should be receiving under a fully-funded school finance formula.

Consent Agenda

You can review the Consent Agenda items here. Among other items, the consent agenda includes monitoring reports on EL-2, EL-3, EL-4 and EL-10. EL-2 and EL-10, specifically, will be discussed later on in the meeting under agenda item 9.0.

A couple of items are especially noteworthy:

There is a request to change the name of the current Stein Elementary at O’Connell (formerly McConnell Middle School) to Emory Elementary School. The proposal also suggests changing the name of the Rose Stein Elementary campus (currently closed for construction) to Rose Stein International Elementary School when it reopens in Fall 2017. Numerous forums and opportunities for community input were made before proposing these name changes.

In separate news, this time last year the district saw 4 administrator resignation, 5 teacher resignations and 25 classified staff resignations. This year, we have 1 administrator resignation, 2 teacher resignations and 15 classified staff resignations. We are hoping to see this trend continue into the summer. We won’t see the numbers for those who resign this summer until the first regular meeting in September, but we are hearing a renewed trust in the BOE. The big concern remains whether Jeffco can be competitive enough with surrounding districts to attract and retain the best and the brightest!

Third Quarter Financial Report

The final item of Thursday’s agenda that we’d like to draw your attention to is the 3rd Quarter Financial Report. You can review the presentation and the report.

Graduation Season

Congratulations to all students in the Class of 2016! Look for School Board members and other District staff at numerous graduation ceremonies over the next few weeks.

JeffCo Proud!

5.2.16 Jeffco Schools Facilities Master Plan Summary

lakwoodAt the end of April, staff presented an updated facilities master plan to the school board at a study session. First, we want to emphasize that the board has not voted on the plan, nor is it planning to finalize any of the recommendations soon.

What is happening is this: staff are now hosting a series of meetings around the district to explain the reasoning behind the plan, answer questions about details of the plan, and collect feedback from parents. The communications department staff is collecting the feedback and making it available to school board members, staff, and even to the public through links to community meeting feedback and survey feedback received before April 28 on the Districtwide Facilities Master Plan page on the Jeffco Schools website. Comments will continue be posted as they are received throughout the feedback process.

Jeffco Schools has also posted other important links with more information about the plan:

There are also multiple community meetings taking place between now and mid-June:

  • May 4, Conifer High School, 8–10 am
  • May 4, Green Mountain High School, 5-7 pm
  • May 31, Ralston Valley High School, 6-8 pm
  • June 1, Pomona High School, 6-8 pm
  • June 4, Stevens Elementary, 8-10 am
  • June 4, Arvada West High School, 11 am – 1 pm
  • June 6, Golden High School, 6-8 pm
  • June 8, Bear Creek High School, 8-10 am
  • June 8, Wheat Ridge High School, 6-8 pm
  • June 9, Stein at O’Connell, 6-8 pm

If you can’t make any of the meetings (or even if you can, but want to provide additional feedback), you can provide feedback via an online survey that is also posted on the Facilities Master Plan page.

So, you may find yourself asking, why are they doing this now?

There are several reasons:

First, the master plan hasn’t been comprehensively updated since 2011.

Second, you’ll likely remember the debate over how to best fund construction of a new school or schools in northwest Arvada: through a bond issue or through Certificates of Participation (COPs), or by pulling money out of classrooms to fund new construction. This was an issue during the recall election last November. The new board members voted to use COPs to build the K-8 at Candelas and to fund phase II of the Sierra Elementary construction. However, all of them were very clear that they prefer to use bonds to finance capital construction.

With that in mind, the board asked staff to update the master plan and to consider what a potential bond package might look like that also takes into account capital needs throughout the district. The facilities master plan is the result.

Third, we’ve been waiting a long time for the economy to get better and state funding to increase, right? Except that the economy has improved and everyone’s property taxes went up and a new marijuana tax was approved and Jeffco Schools still isn’t going to see much (if any) additional state funding. The “negative factor,” allows the state to keep those additional property and marijuana taxes and allocate it to other parts of the state budget — and in fact, our legislators are not giving those additional revenues to the schools.

Nothing about the current funding patterns seems like it will change anytime soon, so we in Jeffco need to tackle our current capital needs ourselves.

One of the big goals of this plan, besides addressing high-growth areas, school overcrowding, and schools with major maintenance needs like new roofs or HVAC systems, is to reduce the amount Jeffco spends on maintenance overall so that those dollars can be used in the classroom. Updated HVAC and electrical systems some schools will produce thousands of dollars in utility cost savings in the long run. It also means that in some cases, the plan suggests school consolidations or closures, along with the replacement of certain school buildings.

“Why are they closing schools and asking money to build new ones?” is a question we’ve heard frequently. The short answer is that on average, our schools are 45 years old and many have major capital needs. If, however, the school can consolidate two of those aging schools into one new and larger school, they’ll save money in the long run. The equation they use is something similar to the one that all of us use when deciding whether to repair or replace an aging car: at some point it becomes cheaper in the long run to buy a new or newer car than to continue sinking thousands of dollar into a 20-year-old car that’s in the shop every few months. A newer car means few if any repair costs and usually better fuel mileage (or in the case of schools, utility savings) as well.

That said, most of the proposals hinge on a successful bond campaign. Without one, it’s not possible to build a new school or addition necessary to consolidate two other schools. And they want the Jeffco community to have a plan that everyone is reasonably happy with, which is the reason they’re asking for so much community feedback. They want to know which parts of the facilities master plan need to be changed before moving forward.

A few more notes on cost: The plan also suggests a couple of minimal cost options. The first one boils down to what Jeffco is already doing: building a K-8 at Candelas, finishing phase II construction at Sierra Elementary, finishing the Rose Stein construction as planned, and continuing with the district’s deferred maintenance plan overall.

A second minimal cost option is to reconfigure schools in four articulation areas as K-5 elementary schools and 6-8 middle schools. It makes use of available space at the middle school level and creates space in elementary schools that may be lacking it. Note that the proposal is not a district-wide proposal to move to a K-5, 6-8 configuration, but rather one based on student numbers in each articulation area. Even in a proposal that is based on bond money, some elementary schools would be left in a K-6, 7-8 pattern in order to not overcrowd the middle school.

Our friends at Support Jeffco Kids posted a summary that includes summary information about each of the articulation areas, and we encourage you read that post or to take time to look at the links we’ve included above.

District staff plan to take the feedback to the board to consider at the board’s June 16 meeting. They are expected to provide further direction regarding the plan to staff at that time. Staff will then incorporate the direction into a new version of the plan, and we’d expect a vote on the revised version at a future meeting. There will also need to be a vote if the school board decided to put a bond issue on the ballot.

As you can see, everything is in the very early stages of planning. Look at the information or attend a forum and then let the board members know what you think through one of the above channels or by simply writing them at board@jeffco.k12.co.us.

JeffCo Proud!

 

 

4.6.16 The AFP is at it again & quick 4/7 BOE meeting preview

This will be a brief update, as all of our writers are currently swamped with other things. We know we owe you a summary of the last couple of meetings and we will have that for you as soon as humanely possible.

However, we wanted to bring your attention to some news uncovered by our friends at Jeffco Citizens for Responsible Education. They noticed that a number of emails regarding the use of Certificates of Participation (COPs) had been sent to the board. The vast majority of those in opposition were one of two form letters. Jeffco CRE followed that trail a bit further, right to the door of Americans for Prosperity, who conveniently set up a webpage so that people could submit a form letter to the board through their website.

Screenshot 2016-04-03 15.33.08

We agree with Jeffco CRE when they write “Colorado is a local control state for a reason.  Outside special interest groups should stop sticking their nose where it doesn’t belong.” Indeed.

In addition, there’s a board meeting this Thursday, April 7.

Highlights

Can’t attend? Stream the meeting live at this link: http://new.livestream.com/accounts/10429076/events/3542310.

JeffCo Proud!

 

3.17.2016 BOE MEETING PREVIEW

writers_forum

The Jeffco School Board will hold a study session this Thursday, March 17, beginning at 5:30 pm. If you cannot attend, you can stream the meeting online. Key matters include:

Jeffco’s Early Childhood Education Program

The Board will hear the latest regarding Jeffco’s growing Early Childhood Education (ECE) Program. This includes preschool, Kindergarten and before- and after-school programs. The Board will also meet ECE community partners during this update.

We’re curious to know the impacts to enrollment in Full-Day Kindergarten (FDK) as a result of the requirement that free FDK be provided to all students on free and reduced lunch (FRL). This is something that hasn’t been clear, so we’re wondering:

  • How many schools were providing free FDK to all students prior to SBB who have stopped doing so, specifically due to the percentage of FRL students in their school? Our understand from last year was that there were 40 schools providing free FDK that went down to 25 schools after the implementation of SBB.
  • As we understand it, schools receive additional funds for free lunch kiddos, but not for reduced lunch kiddos. Therefore, schools have to provide the funds for school fees and free FDK for reduced lunch kiddos from their general fund. How is this impacting schools and what is being done to relieve this pressure?

We’re also wondering if the district or new board has considered a tiered system of charging for FDK like the one Denver Public Schools implemented, which bases tuition upon the size of the family relative to their gross income and ability to pay instead of a flat $300/month fee? Or is there a way the district could move toward offering free FDK for everyone, perhaps on a 5- or 10-year implementation plan? (The ideal situation would be that the state allocates funding to allow all districts to offer free FDK, of course, but we’re well aware of the ongoing state funding problems.)

2nd Quarter Financial Report

Jeffco Chief Financial Officer Kathleen Askelson, a representative from the District’s auditor and members of the District’s Financial Oversight Committee will share the latest financial news. The report identifies funds, departments and/or schools to monitor closely throughout the year.

We’re pleased to see no charter schools are borrowing at the end of this quarter, and Collegiate Academy has closed its line of credit with the District. Budgeting for the 2016-2017 school year will continue to be a hot topic. Stay tuned.

District Accountability Committee

Next, Jeffco Chief Effectiveness Officer Terry Elliott and District Accountability Committee Chair Julie Oxenford-O’Brian will update the Board on the District’s Unified Improvement Plan before it is submitted to the Colorado Department of Education.

Legislative Update

Jeffco’s Lobbyist, Ed Bowditch, will update the Board on legislation affecting schools, districts and education.

When Cindy Stevenson Left Jeffco…

Two years ago, when the Board approved former Superintendent Cindy Stevenson’s early release from her duties, Witt, Newkirk and Williams insisted on barring her from volunteering or being employed in Jeffco Schools in the future.

Paragraph #12, page 5 of 8 of that agreement reads, No continuing right of employment by the District. Dr. Stevenson agrees that she will not apply for or otherwise seek re-employment or seek to volunteer in the District, (emphasis added) including its charter schools until December 31, 2018, and that, in the event she does so, it will be a material breach of this Agreement, and the District and its charter schools will have no obligation to consider her application.”

At the March 3, 2016, meeting, Ron Mitchell asked that this be reviewed by district legal counsel to see if that prohibition could be changed. At the last meeting, Mitchell said he didn’t think that was a typical element of an agreement and that it seemed needless. We are interested in understanding whether that clause can be changed or eliminated, and what the board may have in mind.

We’ll also note for the record that Stevenson is currently employed as Director of the CASE Leadership Initiative, so we don’t think this is a move to reinstate her as superintendent. Barring her from even volunteering in the district, however, was always clearly meant to be spiteful by WNW.

Employee Negotiations

The meeting wraps up with an update on Employee Negotiations – the teacher contract. The Board will hear from Chief Human Resources Officer Amy Weber and contract attorney Jim Branum. The next negotiations session will take place Monday, March 28.

Jeffco Student Headed to Scripps National Spelling Bee – AGAIN!

On a lighter note, we’d like to congratulate Jeffco Schools student Sylvie Lamontagne who will represent Colorado in the Scripps National Spelling Bee for the second year running. Lamontagne, an eighth grader at Creighton Middle School, competed last year and finished 9th out of 285 spellers at the national bee. This is the first time in 20 years that Colorado has had a back-to-back champion, thanks in part to a change in the rules that allows a winner to compete again in the contest. Her winning word was “ossifrage.” Good luck at the national spelling bee!

JeffCo Proud!

 

3.3.16 BOE meeting preview

Here’s a brief run-down of the agenda for the Thursday, March 3 regular meeting. The study session begins at 5:30 and the regular board meeting begins at 6:30 pm.

Your Childs Education

Here’s the link to stream the meeting:  http://new.livestream.com/accounts/10429076/events/3542310

Study Session: Safety Update

District staff have reviewed the Claire Davis Safety Act and the combined and consolidated recommendations from the Arapahoe High School reports. They will talk to the board about the pieces that apply to Jeffco Schools and how recommendations will be implemented. As of this posting, no attachments have been included for this agenda item..

Honors, Recognition and School Reports

The board will honor Sargent Wayne Holverson of the Jeffco Sheriff’s Office for his leadership over the past three years heading up the School Resource Officer (SRO) unit, his SRO work nearly 17 years ago following the Columbine tragedy, his September 2013 work to evacuate more than 120 students and staff from Mt. Evans Outdoor Lab School due to impending flooding, and his general dedication to protecting our students.
The board will also recognize Jeffco Schools’ Employee Assistance Program for receiving the Outstanding EA Program award from the Colorado Employee Assistance Professionals Association chapter. Kathleen Remington, EAP manager, was awarded the Daetwiler Award for an outstanding professional member.

That’s followed by individual member school reports and public comment. Sign up here to address the board during public comment part 1, but remember that only this part is reserved only for items on the agenda. If you want to speak on other items, sign up for public comment part 2.

Consent Agenda

You can review the Consent Agenda items here. Among other items, the consent agenda includes revisions to several board policies to provide clarity, consistency and alignment with state statute. We’ve read through the proposed changes and would like to call your attention to these changes in particular:

GP-06(3)(d): “Regardless of the method, once an item is removed from the consent agenda, it will be added to one of the discussion sections of the meeting in session. The discussion time limit for the item will be determined by a majority vote of the Board. After discussion of the removed consent item, Board members may take a position on the item in the same or next regularly scheduled Board meeting.” This clarifies this procedure. Board members can pull an item off of the consent agenda for discussion, and even if this is the first time they discuss the item, they can still vote during the meeting or they can opt to postpone the vote to allow time for additional information gathering.

We also noticed in GP-06(4) that it seems public comment will only occur during regular business meetings as there is no mention of public comment during study sessions. As a reminder, the previous board voted 5-0 in favor by the previous board. We’d encourage the board to review this policy further and edit to include that public comment will be permitted during study sessions where a vote will be taken to ensure the public has an opportunity to comment before a vote is taken.

GP-13 has been revised to include additional members of Jeffco Schools’ constituency in the District Accountability Committee. One member of the Jeffco PTA and a CSEA member (classified staff such as bus drivers, janitors, etc.) have been added. Additionally, instead of at-large representatives only being appointed by the board, the policy is being revised to clarify that there will be up to 10 representatives with effort made to represent the diversity of stakeholders.

8.01 Academic Goal Update: Career, Workforce and Post-Secondary Readiness-Graduation, Dropout and Remediation Rates

District staff will share during their presentation there are many positives to be proud of, such as a five-year trend of on-time graduation rates shows an overall improvement of 3.8 percentage points for the district with significant improvements for student subgroups (e.g., free and reduced lunch, minorities, and English language learners). In addition, the remediation rate trend shows an overall general improvement with a decrease of 5.1 percentage points for the district.

However, there is always room for improvement. The district must continue to examine and strive to close performance gaps, such as those between white and Hispanic/Latino students and graduation rates between males and females.

In addition, we’d love a little more information about remediation rates. Currently, the remediation rate only reflects Jeffco graduates who attend a public college or university in Colorado. Remediation rates for students who attend a private college or university, or who attend college out of state are not included in this rate. It’s also not clear whether the remediation rate as reported includes only Jeffco students who have graduated in the last four years or whether it includes any Jeffco graduate who tests into a remedial course. Does it also include Jeffco graduates from the ’80s or ’90s who may be going back to school for a career change? 

We’d really love to see if there’s a way to include data for the private and out-of-state institutions to see what Jeffco’s true remediation rate is. Currently, the only thing we do know is that the remediation rate quoted does not reflect all recent Jeffco graduates.

In addition, we noted that less than half of 2015 graduating seniors reached ACT’s college-level coursework readiness benchmark in algebra, social science and biology. ALL students in Colorado were required to take the ACT (and will be required to take the SAT instead in future years), whereas other states only require those planning to attend college to take either the ACT or the SAT.

The question again is what this data really means. Could it be that students are so accustomed to standardized testing that students not planning to attend college may not take the test seriously because it won’t have repercussions for their high school career? Also, is it possible to break down data from previous years to compare the average ACT score among those students who went on to attend college vs. those who did not?

The board and district should look into the root causes of this statistic and how this data might also play into discussion about multiple pathways for career and college readiness and judging student achievement from a body of evidence rather than a single test score — an issue that seems especially important for career-focused students such as those studying a vocation at Warren Tech. 

9. Discussion Agenda

The projected cost to build a new school at Candelas has increased from $25M to $31M. There are likely several reasons for this, the most likely culprit being inflation. Steve Bell was extremely clear that construction cost inflation was playing a role in the costs associated with the last year of repairs that were part of the 2012 3B bond in previous board presentations.  We’d guess that inflation in building costs is the reason that the cost has increased over the estimate the district staff gave the board a year ago, though we look forward to a more detailed explanation at the meeting.

If the root cause for the increase is indeed inflation, it’s more clear proof that WNW’s insistence on dragging its heels was indeed pennywise and pound foolish.

Jeffco Proud!